Midlands productions

Published: 14 April 2019

There will be a half-term treat for children when Milkshake Live! puts on Milkshake Monkey’s Musical at Buxton Opera House on Monday.

Nick Hancock plays an insurance consultant whose attempt to sell a get-rich-quick scheme is interrupted by a bungling burglar in Octopus Soup! by Jack Milner and Mark Stevenson which is on the menu at Malvern Theatres from Monday until Saturday.

John Partridge and Charlie Stemp experience a Rough Crossing in Tom Stoppard’s play which sails into the Theatre Royal, Nottingham from Monday until Saturday.

Living House Theatre stages Come to Daddy, a “live-art mash-up of family history, art history and a show about the long, long journey to the here and now” which is inspired by the work of Tadeusz Kantor and other icons and has been created by Sammy Metcalfe and the company, at Lakeside Arts, Nottingham on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Shone Productions takes you over the rainbow in The Wizard Of Oz, featuring Barney Harwood as Scarecrow and Sapphire Elia as Dorothy, at Stafford Gatehouse Theatre on Wednesday.

Vicki Michelle, Josephine Partridge and Julie Coombe discuss the joys of being a 21st century woman in Hormonal Housewives at the Albany Theatre, Coventry on Wednesday.

Ballet Black performs a triple bill of Ingoma (Song), created by company dancer and choreographer Mthuthuzeli November, Martin Lawrance’s Pendulum and CLICK! By Sophie Laplane in Derngate, Northampton on Wednesday while on the Royal stage the world première of Mike Poulton’s version of Henrik Ibsen’s masterpiece Ghosts starring Penny Downie and directed by Lucy Bailey runs from Friday until Saturday 11 May.

Story Pocket Theatre takes David Baddiel’s “magical and wonderfully comic story” ANiMALCOLM the Musical to Nottingham Playhouse on Wednesday and mac Birmingham on Saturday and Sunday.

Patrick Lynch adapts and performs Tom Thumb in the MET Studio at Stafford Gatehouse Theatre on Thursday and Matt McGuinness’s debut show We Are What We Overcome which “sheds light on mental health with self-deprecating honesty and dark humour” can be seen in the MET Studio on Friday.

The Young REP gets to grips with Evan Placey’s reimagining of Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde on the main stage at Birmingham REP from Thursday until Saturday 27 April while The Half God of Rainfall, a “contemporary epic that weaves poetry and storytelling in a majestic journey that transports us from a tiny village in south west Nigeria to Mount Olympus, to the further reaches of our galaxy and beyond”, continues in the REP Studio until Saturday.

Children’s favourites Ben and Holly and their friends go on a musical adventure “packed full of games, songs and laughter” in Ben and Holly’s Little Kingdom at Wolverhampton Grand Theatre on Friday and Saturday.

Celebrating his 80th birthday by touring a new solo show, Ian McKellen on Stage visits the Belgrade Theatre, Coventry on Saturday.

Neil Duffield’s The Jungle Book, Derby Theatre’s first in-house production with fully integrated BSL signing, continues until Saturday.

A “moving drama of hope, dreams and close-knit communities amid endemic 19th century societal inequality”, Lizzie Nunnery’s 2007 play Intemperance continues at the New Vic, Newcastle-under-Lyme until Saturday.

The world première of Rona Munro’s adaptation of Louis de Bernieres’s Captain Corelli’s Mandolin continues at Curve, Leicester until Saturday.

Cameron Mackintosh’s production of Boublil and Schönberg’s musical Les Misérables continues at Birmingham Hippodrome until Saturday 11 May.

At the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford, a gender-swapped version of The Taming of the Shrew, set in a 1590s matriarchal England in which women hold all the power, and Kimberley Sykes’s “fierce, exhilarating version” of Shakespeare’s romantic comedy As You Like It both continue in the Royal Shakespeare Theatre until Saturday 31 August, while in the Swan Theatre, John Kani and Antony Sher perform in the world première of Kani’s play Kunene and the King which continues until Tuesday 23 April.

Steve Orme