Baby Face

Kay Dye
Summerhall
to

Let me apologize to the many who loved this piece. They are in the majority. It is a piece that, taken out of context, is one of those raw performance pieces that works by is sheer courage, creativity and energy.

Katy Dye has bravely thrown herself out there just about as far as you can go. She wants to examine the infantilism of women and how closely it borders to paedophilia. She takes us from a 26-year-old who could pass for a younger and younger female until she compares herself to and infant. "Do you want me?"

The piece starts out with an infant’s white high chair and an inordinate amount of fog. She begins moving around the space and the chair wailing at deafening amplitude. She completes this section by twirling, swinging the chair at a velocity that could do serious damage if let loose.

We very quickly get the point. Women want to be viewed as younger because men would like them younger. And that's bad. Many a first wife will tell you venomously about the age of the second wife. We don’t like it. Women definitely don’t like it and men will probably admit that it’s not a socially heathy approach to a relationship. They've often learned the hard way.

But from the birth of NOW through the various serious and worthwhile movements to protect women in the workplace and society with equity, we have continued to bash men. We ask them to change and don’t tell them how or into what. We ask them to give up a lot and give them nothing in return. Enough from what I’m sure is a very unpopular soapbox.

So, we get what Katy Dye is trying to say. Although it is too well disguised in this style over substance performance. Ms. Dye has overreached burying her message in fog, baby lotion and baby powder. But kudos for getting it out there in a way that attracts a large and supportive audience.

Catherine Lamm