Lucky 8

Stephanie Silver
Glass Half Full Theatre
[email protected]
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Lucky 8

Marcy (author Stephanie Silver) is gay but not in a relationship. This may be because her social life is limited by her caring responsibilities for her mother who has multiple sclerosis. Or maybe her gauche personality—she cannot help blurting out the first, often inappropriate, thought entering her head—prevents her forming relationships. Nevertheless, Marcy feels a strong attraction—which she suspects is mutual—for a co-worker (unnamed and played by Velenzia Spearpoint) who makes a habit of checking a novelty lucky 8 ball before making decisions. Marcy’s declaration of passion becomes an unintentional catalyst forcing her co-worker to examine her life choices.

Rather than a duologue, Lucky 8 is a pair of separate but connected monologues. Amelia Lovesy directs as if for the stage. The setting is an abstract white environment in which one of the cast takes the lead and the other stands to the rear contributing the occasional remark before stepping forward to take over for the other monologue.

Lucky 8 works best as a pair of character studies. There is the sense of one person anxious to make a start on the next stage in her life while the other is ruefully examining how she came to be in her current situation. Author Stephanie Silver may have chosen the less satisfying role. Marcy is a quirky, even charming character but shallow. She is socially awkward and over-impressed by what she regards as her co-worker’s sophistication—such as wearing linen clothes. Velenzia Spearpoint takes a mature approach to the co-worker looking for answers as to how her life became so complex and reluctantly coming to a decision that seems inescapable.

Although Lucky 8 is presented as part of the online series of plays from the [email protected] site, it is hard to avoid the feeling it would work just as well on stage.

Reviewer: David Cunningham