Punk Rock

Simon Stephens
Lyric Hammersmith and touring
(2010)

If you missed Simon Stephens's Punk Rock this time last year, now's your chance to make good. Despite only three of the original cast having survived to join this touring production, in most important respects it's a facsimile of the premiere.

This is not an unequivocally good thing. While ultimately rewarding, Punk Rock is a slow starter. Until the interval, little happens besides a bunch of Stockport sixth-formers chatting in the library. What's said is often insightful, sometimes suprising, and undaunted by big themes, but offers few clues about where the play might be headed. This is intentional, but potentially makes for a meandering, purposeless first half. The original production didn't surmount this issue, and this one, being a near-perfect recreation, doesn't either.

By the interval, enough tension has accumulated to tauten the sails and drive the play to its heart-thumping conclusion. A large portion of that tension is attributable to Bennett Francis, the bully whose faux-congenial humiliation games seem calculated to incubate retaliatory action.

Bennett's is the only noticeably altered portrayal. In 2009, Henry Lloyd-Hughes lent the character a genuine affability that suggested he believed his own bullshit, that to him his victimisation of poor awkward genius Chadwick Meade really was just horseplay. With a sneering Edward Franklin in the blazer instead, Bennett is intentionally spiteful rather than monstrously insensitive; his villainy is a little more clear-cut, which peels an onionskin-thin layer of nuance away from the deliberately unfathomable climax.

Until 18th September and then touring to Sheffield, Edinburgh, Birmingham, Eastbvourne, Salisbury, Plymouth, Oxford, Leicester and Warwick

Kevin Catchpole reviewed this production in Salisbury

Matt Boothman