The Big Bite Size Breakfast (Programme 3)

Bridgette Burton, Thomas Coash, Chris White, C J Johnson
White Room Theatre
Pleasance Dome

This company presents early morning theatre in tiny chunks. The third programme is well worth catching, both for the writing and acting. It would also be good to pay homage to the director(s) but he/she does not get a credit in the programme.

Bad Bride by Bridgette Burton

The opener is an amusing comedy sketch set on the wedding day of Peter and Jules (Sean Williams and Lisa Beresford).

To allay her nerves, the bride has taken every prescription drug known to man and at least one that isn't available at the average chemist's.

Bridgette Burton takes this situation and develops a comedy around it.

Thin Air by Thomas Coash

Thin Air is the stand-out play from this set. It also showcases the considerable talents of Alice Robinson who plays Bird, a widowed funambulist or tightrope walker.

In under quarter of an hour, the writer and actor take us through a mini history of this rarefied art form and give viewers an insight into what makes these people do what they do.

Witty and touching, Thin Air marks Thomas Coash out as a star in the making.

Thespian by Chris White

Thespian features a couple of New York construction workers and takes us through a subway ride in which one coaches the other for his first ever acting audition

While the backstory is a little hard to imagine, the performances of Williams playing the wannabe Brando and especially Andy Hutchison as his coach are memorable.

The writer has fun, allowing his thesp in the making to run through Brooklyn takes on Shakespeare, Miller, Williams and even Anne Frank.

The Bar by C J Johnson

The two actresses star in this amusing comedy sketch pitting tubby Mary against her ultra-fit personal trainer.

Their battleground is a chocolate bar and at one point, it seems as if the fight could be to the death.

Perfect Stillness by Jane Miller

The final play is a dark comedy in which Timmy (Hutchison) tries to write a eulogy for his dead wife, Annie (Miss Beresford).

The shtick is that from inside the coffin, rather than beyond the grave, she provides literary criticism of his efforts before the tables are turned.

Reviewer: Philip Fisher