Murder on the Dancefloor

Ollie Norton-Smith
Spies Like Us
Pleasance Courtyard
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The highly impressive Spies Like Us returns to the Fringe following their successful production of Woyzeck and Our Man in Havana. These highly talented Young Pleasance graduates have forged a unique physical theatre style in storytelling that both excites and entertains.

Written and skilfully directed by Ollie Norton-Smith, Murder on the Dance Floor explodes on to the intimate stage at the Pleasance in a high-octane energetic performance that left me breathless and in awe at their dexterity.

It’s a coming of age story. Sabrina, the outstanding Phoebe Campbell, has returned home from university and now faces the real world of finding a job. The themes of securing enough money to live on, developing friendships and jealousy are explored.

Her father (Tullio Campanale) is anxious that she should find a place of her own as soon as possible because he wants to sell the house for personal reasons. Jono (Hamish Lloyd Barnes) didn’t go to university and has established himself in a well-paid job and Louis (Alex Holley) is looking for a flat share despite receiving a healthy inheritance, but under tragic circumstances. Martha (Francesca Thompson) is hoping to make it in journalism if only she can get a front page story.

The staging is dazzling with breathtaking choreography and agility. The sweat pours off the brows of the actors as they dash across the stage with powerful intense movements. An inventive touch is the use of measuring tapes as if to size up their options.

Clever use is made of moveable flexible lights to highlight the scenes and Oscar Maguire’s soundtrack is emotive.

But will these money-driven youngsters find their place in an ever-changing world and who exactly is murdered?

Spies Like Us has captured the ‘Spirit of the Fringe’ in this excellent production. Go!

Reviewer: Robin Strapp